Fruity facts!

With so many lifestyle diseases being evident today it is time to incorporate more fruits in our daily diet because fruits are great sources of vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals (a group of compounds that may help prevent diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes) and soluble fibre. Except for a few varieties (coconut, olives, avocados) all fruits are low in fat and calories. Fruits also satisfy your sweet tooth without loading up on calories.

Eating a variety of fruits is vital because different fruits provide different nutrients. For example, oranges and kiwi fruit are good sources of vitamin C. Bananas are a good source of potassium and apricots are high in vitamin A. So if you rarely venture beyond a few of your favourites, you are missing out on the nutrients and benefits of other fruits.

Here are suggestions to help you select the highest quality fruits when you are shopping, ways to store them once you get home, and tips for preparing and serving fruits to enhance their flavour and retain their nutrients.

Selecting top quality fruits: Choose in-season fruits. Select fruits that feel heavy for their size as heaviness is a good sign of juiciness. Smell fruits for characteristic aromas. Fruits should generally have their characteristic ripe scent but not smell overly ripe. For example, muskmelon should not smell too musty, especially if you do not plan to eat it right away. Also test the texture. A kiwi that feels mushy to the touch is too ripe. However, an avocado with a somewhat spongy texture is ideal. Be sensitive to the correct texture for the specific fruit you are interested in.

Storing tips: Keep fruits at room temperature to ripen them. Store ripe fruits in your refrigerator. The cool temperature slows the ripening process, giving you longer storage times. The length of time you can store fruit depends on many factors, including how ripe the fruit is at the time of purchase and the type of fruit. Oranges keep well from one to two weeks in your refrigerator. Others, such as strawberries and grapes may ripen and spoil in less time, even in a couple of days.

Serving ideas:

  • Prepare fresh fruit within about an hour of serving to maximize flavour, texture and nutrients. Some salads benefit from a little chilling time (about 30-60 minutes) for the various flavours to mingle well together.
  • Wash all fruits thoroughly under cold running water before cutting or eating whole. This includes those fruits with hard shells or skins, such as melons. That is because the knife you use to cut the melon could transfer germs from the surface into the flesh. Wash your hands before and after handling fresh fruits.
  • Leave on edible peels whenever possible. The peels of apples, pears and most fruits with pits add interesting colour and texture to recipes and contain added nutrients and fibre.
  • Remove zest from citrus peels before discarding and save it for other recipes. The zest is the thin, brightly coloured, outermost layer of citrus fruit, such as lemons or oranges. Grated or shredded, it adds a bright spark of flavour and colour enhancement to both sweet and savoury dishes.
  • A healthy diet does not have to be monotonous. Be adventurous. Try all the new and unfamiliar fruits. You may be surprised to find that you like them, and they will add interest and more health benefits to your diet.

Try this recipe and find several more on http://www.sanjeevkapoor.com

FRESH FRUIT TART

FRESH FRUIT TART 

Ingredients

1 pear
1 small pineapple, peeled
1 medium mango
1 kiwi, peeled
2 plums
2-3 large red grapes
2½ cups refined flour + for dusting
1 cup butter + for greasing
½ cup castor sugar
1¼ cups chilled whipped cream

Method

1. Preheat oven at 180°C. Line a 7-inch tart mould by greasing with a little butter and dusting with little refined flour.

2. To make tart mould, combine refined flour, butter and castor sugar in a bowl. Rub well till the mixture resembles breadcrumbs.

3. Add little water and mix into a soft dough. Refrigerate for 15 minutes.

4. Dust dough with little flour and roll out into a large disc. Line the prepared tart mould and press from inside so that the dough set properly inside the mould. Discard the edges, press the sides with the thumb and prick the inside base with a knife. Fill the inside by keeping kidney beans on the base and put in the preheated oven. Blind bake for 12-15 minutes.

5. Remove mould from oven and demould.

6. Cut and deseed pear. Roughly chop pineapple. Peel, deseed and roughly chop mango. Slice kiwi. Deseed and roughly chop plums.

7. Spread whipped cream inside the tart mould and level it out. Place chopped fruits on it the way you want.

8. Deseed red grapes and halve them. Place them in the tart and serve immediately.

PS: This recipe is such that you can try out several different combinations of fruits and toppings, let me know if you put your own spin on it and how!

Till then
Happy cooking, happy eating! Stay healthy stay fit!

You can lower your cholesterol

Greetings from Singapore! I will be back home in a day or two. I am enjoying seafood and so are Alyona and the kids. In fact, fish always gets me thinking about cholesterol and how it is a food that can actually help to lower cholesterol. In case you do not eat fish there are other foods that cleanse the arteries. In fact, by consuming foods that are low in cholesterol, your body has more of a chance to remain ‘heart-attack’ free!

Fish (Omega 3) – Diets high in omega-3 can lower the risk of heart disease and reduce blood pressure, as well as reduce the risk of blood clots. Not only do fish high in omega-3 reduce the risk of heart disease, they also are very important for the development of good eyesight and nervous system function, and can even fight off some forms of cancer.

Nuts – Nuts also contain omega-3 fatty acids that can help eliminate the risk of heart disease. Nuts, such as walnuts and almonds can help lower cholesterol.

Lean Red Meat – Pieces of meat with all of their fat intact, are cholesterol high foods, but take away the fat, and you now have healthy, low cholesterol meals. Lean meat does not raise cholesterol levels, is low in saturated fat, and is a great source of vitamin B12, zinc, iron, and protein.

Reduced-Fat Dairy Products – Foods, such as whole milk, cheese, and eggs contain large amounts of cholesterol. However, there is no need to cut dairy out of your diet. Simply look for reduced-fat or cholesterol free foods. For example, rather than drinking whole milk, opt for skim milk or 2% milk, instead. Eat fat-free or low-fat yogurt with fresh fruits. Choose reduced-fat cheeses, made with skim milk.

Fruits and Vegetables – Fruits, such as apples oranges, and apricots and vegetables, like cabbage and sweet potatoes are not only cholesterol free foods, they are also high in soluble fibre and pectin. Both of these things have been proven to help lower cholesterol levels.

Oats and Grains – A soluble fibre present in oats and grains is crucial in lowering cholesterol. Doctors recommend two to four cups of oat or barley cereal each day to gain the cholesterol-lowering effect of this fibre.

What good is all this if you cannot make something out of them? So here are some recipes that make good use of these foods!


Fish in Foil
Fruity Salad
Oats Pancake with Maple Syrup

Till I write again,
Sanjeev Kapoor.